PROF Liz SONENBERG

PROF Liz SONENBERG

Positions

  • Intelligent agent technologies
  • Multi-agent systems-collaboration and teamwork, Automated negotiation and decision support, Context-aware computing. (Computational modelling of Human problem solving)
  • Technologies for personalisation

Overview

OverviewText1

  • I am a professor in the Department of Computing and Information Systems and also hold the part-time role of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research Collaboration and Infrastructure) in Chancellery, with responsibility for policy frameworks regarding the University's interdisciplinary research institutes, and for planning of university-wide research infrastructure.

    The integrating theme of my research is the conceptualisation and construction of more adaptive, distributed, and intelligent information systems. Much of the work focuses on agent technology, which views a distributed system in terms of interacting autonomous software entities. Using the agent metaphor can allow system developers to adopt a level of abstraction in design that is useful for modelling complex tasks and environments, and in building software systems that are robust in the face of change and unexpected events. An important aspect of the research is the requirement of the human-machine interface and consequent implications for the development of computational mechanisms to support decision-making in complex settings.  My current research focus is on the design of software tools that support human-automation teams (ie teams comprised of software agents, robots and humans), in coordinating and collaborating in complex changing environments.   

Publications

Selected publications

Research

Investigator on

Awards

Education and training

  • DipCompSt, University of Melbourne 1982
  • PhD, Monash University 1976
  • BSc, Monash University 1972

Supervision

Available for supervision

  • Y

Supervision Statement

  • The integrating theme of my research is the conceptualisation and construction of adaptive, distributed, intelligent information systems. I have considerable interest and experience collaborative research, including with various industry partners and research co-supervision with colleagues in Psychology, Education, and Medicine. My current research focus is on the design of software tools that support human-automation teams (ie teams comprised of software agents, robots and humans), in coordinating and collaborating in complex changing environments. In contrast to much research in autonomous systems that seeks to take humans out of the loop, my research specifically addresses the design of non-human team members that can be successful partners to humans in collaborative activity. Scenarios where sophisticated human-automation teamwork is required include remote management of air or ground vehicles, robot-assisted search and rescue operations, and robot-assisted assembly in manufacturing. The use of software assistants and physical robots to support human activities will increase in coming years, and novel mechanisms to support natural human-machine interaction will gain increasing importance. I am interested in supervising strong computationally and/or mathematically trained students in many aspects of the study of human-automation systems. See my web page for examples of the student topics and publications I have been involved in, in recent years, and please email me if you are interested in PhD studies in my areas of expertise.