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A/PROF Glen SCHOLZ

Positions

  • Host-pathogen interactions
  • Inflammatory diseases
  • Innate immunity

Overview

OverviewText1

  • Glen Scholz is a Principal Research Fellow and an Associate Professor at the Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute and Melbourne Dental School. Glen joined The University of Melbourne in 2002, after postdoctoral research positions at the Rockefeller University in New York, and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in Melbourne. His research seeks to understand the inflammatory responses of innate immune cells to bacterial pathogens, and how pathogens attempt to disrupt or hijack specific pathways in these cells to dysregulate host immunity. This is important because the dysregulation of host immunity is central to the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including periodontitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and orogastrointestinal cancers. However, by understanding the complex interactions between innate immune cells and bacterial pathogens he hopes to develop more effective therapeutic approaches (e.g. drugs and vaccines) to treat various diseases.   

Affiliation

Member of

  • International Association for Dental Research. Member, Infection and Immunity Group 2015 -

Publications

Selected publications

Research

Awards

Education and training

  • PhD, Flinders University of South Australia 1992
  • MAppSc, South Australian Institute of Technology 1988
  • BAppSc, South Australian Institute of Technology 1986

Supervision

Available for supervision

  • Y

Supervision Statement

  • Our research focuses on the inflammatory responses of innate immune cells to bacterial pathogens, and how pathogens hijack specific pathways in these cells to dysregulate host immunity. Importantly, the dysregulation of host immune mechanisms by bacterial pathogens is central to the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including periodontitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and orogastrointestinal cancers. However, by understanding at a molecular level the complex interactions between immune cells and bacterial pathogens we hope to develop more effective therapeutic approaches to treat various human diseases.

    I am always looking for passionate and motivated Honours, Masters and PhD students to join our research team!  Please contact me to discuss your research interests.  Email: glenms@unimelb.edu.au.

    Further information about our research (including student projects) can be found at: www.dental.unimelb.edu.au/about/staff/scholz-glen.