DR Shani Dettman

DR Shani Dettman

Positions

  • communication outcomes- children with hearing loss (cochlear implant)

Overview

OverviewText1

  • Dr Shani Dettman worked as a speech pathologist in the Cochlear Implant Clinic (CIC) and researcher at the University of Melbourne from 1987 to 2005, developing protocols for the pre- and post-implant assessment and management of young children with significant hearing loss. In 1997, Shani completed her Masters of Education, at the University of Melbourne which analysed preverbal communication development of children before and after the cochlear implant. In 2003, Shani completed accreditation for Auditory Verbal Certification. In 2005, she completed her Doctorate of Philosophy at The University of Melbourne which examined the relationship between the primary caregivers’ linguistic, semantic and prosodic input to the child and the child’s long term communication outcomes. This PhD led to numerous post-doctoral studies which described and optimised maternal input to the child with significant hearing loss. Shani is currently Senior Lecturer (University of Melbourne), in the Master of Speech Pathology and Audiology courses. She is lead researcher in the present HEARing Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) Extension; “Seeds of language development” and “Therapies to improve language and literacy in hearing-impaired children”. The HEARing (CRC)s facilitate multi-centre research collaboration regarding evidence based and effective management of paediatric hearing loss. Shani has supervised 52 University of Melbourne students since 2000 to successfully meet the requirements for their research minor thesis. These research projects have been presented at local and international conferences, allowing the students to experience working within a research team, and wider dissemination of their results. She is also presently supervising 5 PhD students. As of November 2015, Shani had 45 scientific publications including; 33 journal articles (10 - first author), 5 book chapters (2 - first author), 7 refereed conference papers when the paper was published in full in the proceedings (   

Affiliation

Member of

  • Speech Pathology Australia. member 2005 -

Publications

Selected publications

Research

Investigator on

Additional Grant Information

  • In 2006 and in 2007, the Deafness Foundation supported a series of studies regarding "Facilitating optimum primary caregiver input". In 2006, The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital supported a speech production study entitled "The emerging speech production in young children using the cochlear implant". In 2008, Shani was awarded a grant from Deafness Foundation to support "Comparison of parental MLU directed to children using cochlear implants versus parental MLU directed to normally hearing siblings" In 2008 the RVEEH Research Committee supported projects: "Maternal Linguistic input to children with profound hearing loss and their normally hearing siblings" and "Receptive and expressive language development in children aged 8 to 10 who received implants under three years of age". In 2010 The RVEEH Research Committee supported project 12/1063H "Parental views on the child's communication journey after cochlear implantation". Shani is presently leading research collaboration between the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology (MDHS), the Melbourne Graduate School of Education (MGSE) and the Victorian Department of Education & Training, (DET) on a series of studies supported by a 2015 common funding agreement, investigating "Educational support for students with hearing loss:Policy, Practice and Outcomes".   

Awards

Education and training

  • PhD, University of Melbourne 2005
  • M.Ed, University of Melbourne 1997
  • BAppSc, La Trobe University 1985

Linkages

Supervision

Available for supervision

  • Y

Supervision Statement

  • outcomes for children with significant hearing loss, role of maternal input in fostering language development in the child, educational practice and policy supporting school aged children with bilateral hearing loss