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A/Prof

Craig Olsson

Melbourne School Of Psychological Sciences
Life course Epidemiology
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
humans
female
adolescent
male
social sciences
psychology
Craig Olsson's Profile Picture
A/Prof

Craig Olsson

 
Division
Medicine, Dentistry And Health Sciences
 
Primary Interest
Developmental Psychology
Craig Olsson's Profile Picture
A/Prof

Craig Olsson

 

Craig is a Developmental Psychologist with expertise in lifecourse epidemiology and human genetics. He was awarded an NHMRC Investigator Grant, commencing 2020 and is a former recipient of an Australian Research Council Discovery Outstanding Researcher Award.

Craig directs one of Australia's longest running longitudinal studies of social-emotional development, The Australian Temperament Project Generation 3 Study. He is actively involved in a number of Australasian cohort studies and is National Convenor of the Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth (ARACY) Longitudinal Studies Network. He has been based at the Melbourne Royal Children's Hospital since 1994, completed his PhD through the University of Melbourne in 2000, and currently holds appointments in lifecourse epidemiology at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (Royal Children's Hospital) and Deakin University. He is founding convener of the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute LifeCourse initiative, Director of the Deakin Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development, and has an active interest in helping researchers gain a better understanding of cohort studies run on campus, population and clinical, and how they might be used to advance understanding of social-emotional development, from infancy to adulthood and into the next generation.

Scholarly Works

Displaying the 168 most recent scholarly works by Craig Olsson.

Credentials

Positions


Casual

Melbourne School Of Psychological Sciences

Honorary

Melbourne School Of Psychological Sciences

Honorary

Paediatrics Royal Children'S Hospital

Education


Psychology

University of Melbourne

Psychology

University of Melbourne