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Dr

Nancy Wang

Research Fellow
Vaccines
T cell immunity
Pathogenesis
Antigen selection
Gene regulation
Virulence mechanism
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Salmonella
Immune evasion
Nancy Wang's Profile Picture
Dr

Nancy Wang

 
Division
Medicine, Dentistry And Health Sciences
 
Primary Interest
Immunity against bacterial infection
Nancy Wang's Profile Picture
Dr

Nancy Wang

 

Nancy Wang is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne. Her main research interest is to understand the mechanism of cellular immunity that confers protection against bacterial infections, including those caused by pathogenic serovars of Salmonella enterica (e.g.

Typhi and Typhimurium), Klebsiella pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes. She has recently received a Discovery Project grant from the Australian Research Council (ARC) for defining antigen selection mechanisms that control T cell immunity against bacteria.

Nancy completed her PhD training in Dr Tom Brodnicki’s laboratory at St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne (2013). The PhD project bridged genetics and immunology and led to the discovery of a novel genetic switch point with dual roles in bacterial infection and autoimmune diabetes. Since then, she has been a postdoctoral researcher in Prof Dick Strugnell’s laboratory at the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, one of the partners at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity. Nancy's work has been presented at national and international conferences, and as invited seminars at several research institutes. She has also supervised a number of under- and post-graduate students, including three RHD students to completion to date.

Nancy's recent research highlights include the identification of a novel collection of Salmonella proteins that are targeted by CD4+ T cells, an essential subset of the adaptive immune response that confers vaccine-induced protection against many bacterial infections. Ongoing work aims to define the 'selection criteria' for immunodominant T cell antigens that may, for example, act as candidates for future vaccine design, while the formation of antigen-specific T cell memory may provide a useful biomarker for predicting protection efficacy in vaccinated individuals.

Scholarly Works

Displaying the 24 most recent scholarly works by Nancy Wang.

Credentials

Positions


Research Fellow

Microbiology And Immunology

Education


Doctor of Philosophy

University of Melbourne

Bachelor of Science (Hons)

University of Melbourne

Bachelor of Biomedical Science

University of Melbourne