Journal article

Socio-hydrological water balance for water allocation between human and environmental purposes in catchments

S Zhou, Y Huang, Y Wei, G Wang

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences | COPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBH | Published : 2015

Abstract

Rebalancing water allocation between human consumptive uses and the environment in water catchments is a global challenge. This paper proposes a socio-hydrological water balance framework by partitioning catchment total evapotranspiration (ET) into ET for society and ET for natural ecological systems, and establishing the linkage between the changes of water balance and its social drivers and resulting environmental consequences in the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), Australia, over the period 1900-2010. The results show that the 100-year period of water management in the MDB could be divided into four periods corresponding to major changes in basin management within the socio-hydrological water..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by National Key Science and Technology Project Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) during the Twelfth Five-year Project


Awarded by Research and Development Special Fund for Public Welfare Industry of the Ministry of Water Research in China


Funding Acknowledgements

The water balance and land use data were supplied by the Australian Water Availability Project (http://www.eoc.csiro.au/awap/) and the History Database of the Global Environment (http://www.pbl.nl/hyde/). Figure 1 was developed by Zelalem Tesemma and Yongping Wei. Andrew Western from the University of Melbourne gave very valuable comments on the revision of this manuscript. This paper is financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 91125018), the Australian Research Council (ARC) (FT130100274), the National Key Science and Technology Project Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) during the Twelfth Five-year Project (no. 2013BAB05B03), the Research and Development Special Fund for Public Welfare Industry of the Ministry of Water Research in China (no. 201301081).