Journal article

The indirect impact of antiretroviral therapy: Mortality risk, mental health, and HIV-negative labor supply

Victoria Baranov, Daniel Bennett, Hans-Peter Kohler

Journal of Health Economics | ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV | Published : 2015

Abstract

To reduce the burden of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, international donors recently began providing free antiretroviral therapy (ART) in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. ART dramatically prolongs life and reduces infectiousness for people with HIV. This paper shows that ART availability increases work time for HIV-negative people without caretaker obligations, who do not directly benefit from the medicine. A difference-in-difference design compares people living near and far from ART, before and after treatment becomes available. Next we explore the possible reasons for this pattern. Although we cannot pinpoint the mechanism, we find that ART availability substantially reduces subjective mortality risk..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Child Health and Development


Awarded by National Institute on Aging


Awarded by National Institute of Child Health and Development Population Research Infrastructure Program


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH &HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING


Funding Acknowledgements

We received helpful suggestions from Kerwin Charles, Andrew Dorward, Erica Field, Willa Friedman, Guther Fink, Erick Gong, Kelsey Jack, Dean Karlan, Ofer Malamud, Sendhil Mullainathan, Emily Oster, Julian Reif, Rebecca Thornton, Alessandra Voena, Nicholas Wilson, and seminar participants at the University of Chicago, the University of California San Diego, and the University of Illinois at Chicago. IRBs at the University of Pennsylvania and the National Health and Science Research Committee in Malawi have approved collection of the MLSFH. The authors gratefully acknowledge the generous support for this research through the National Institute of Child Health and Development (Grant Numbers R03HD058976, R21HD050653, R01HD044228, R01HD053781), the National Institute on Aging (Grant Number P30AG12836), the Boettner Center for Pensions and Retirement Security at the University of Pennsylvania, and the National Institute of Child Health and Development Population Research Infrastructure Program (Grant Number R24HD044964).