Journal article

Interferon-lambda Genotype and Low Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection

Josephine H Li, Xiang Qian Lao, Hans L Tillmann, Jennifer Rowell, Keyur Patel, Alexander Thompson, Sunil Suchindran, Andrew J Muir, John R Guyton, Stephen D Gardner, John G McHutchison, Jeanette J McCarthy

HEPATOLOGY | WILEY | Published : 2010

Abstract

UNLABELLED: Recently, genetic polymorphisms occurring in the interferon (IFN)-lambda gene region were associated with response to IFN-based treatment of hepatitis C infection. Both infection with the hepatitis C virus and IFN therapy are associated with decreased serum cholesterol and high cholesterol has been associated with increased likelihood to respond to IFN. We sought to determine if the IFN-lambda gene variant was also associated with serum lipid levels in chronic hepatitis C patients. We compared genotypes of the rs12979860 polymorphism, located proximal to the IL28 gene, with serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels in 746 subjects with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, not current..

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Grants

Awarded by National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health (NIH)


Awarded by NIH at Duke University Medical Center


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

Supported in part by a grant from the David H. Murdock Institute for Business and Culture through the M.U.R.D.O.C.K Study and Award 1 UL<INF>1</INF> RR024128-01 from the National Center for Research Resources, a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research, and its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of NCRR or NIH. Dr. Thompson received support from the Duke Clinical Research Institute, a generous research gift from the Richard B. Boebel Family Fund, the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, and the Gastroenterology Society of Australia. Dr. Rowell is supported by NIH Training Grant T32-DK007012-31 at Duke University Medical Center.Study collaborators Arlene Hughes and Michael Mosteller and co-author Stephen Gardner are employed by GlaxoSmithKline. Dr. Thompson is a consultant for Schering-Plough. Dr. McHutchison received grants from Echosers, Idera Pharmaceutical, Intarcia, Medtronic, Osiris Therapeutics, Three Rivers Pharmaceuticals, and ViroChem Pharma. He is a consultant for and received grants from Abbott Laboratories, Biolex, Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline, GlobeImmune, Hoffman-LaRoche, Human Genome Sciences, Intarcia, Merck Group, Novartis, Pfizer, Pharmasset, and Vertex. He is also a consultant for Anadys, Avila, Epiphany Biosciences, and iTheRx.