Journal article

Quality of Public Open Spaces and Recreational Walking

Takemi Sugiyama, Lucy D Gunn, Hayley Christian, Jacinta Francis, Sarah Foster, Paula Hooper, Neville Owen, Billie Giles-Corti

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH | AMER PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOC INC | Published : 2015

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined associations between specific public open space (POS) attributes and recreational walking to local POS. METHODS: Between October 2004 and December 2006, 1465 adults of the RESIDential Environments Project, conducted in Perth, Australia, reported whether they walk to a POS for recreation. For each participant, we identified all open spaces larger than 0.8 hectares within 1.6 kilometers from home. On the basis of field audit data, we created 3 scores (presence, count, size-weighted presence) for 19 specific open space attributes. RESULTS: With logistic regression analyses, we found that walking to a POS was associated with the presence of gardens, grassed areas, walking..

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Grants

Awarded by Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway)


Awarded by Australian Research Council Linkage


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Healthy Livable Communities


Awarded by NHMRC-National Heart Foundation Early Career fellowship


Awarded by Healthway Health Promotion Research fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by NHMRC senior principal research fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC principal research fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The RESIDential Environments Project (RESIDE) study was funded by the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway; grant 11828), the Australian Research Council Linkage (grant LP0455453), and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC; grant 458688). L.D. Gunn and P. Hooper were supported by the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Healthy Livable Communities (grant 1061404). H. Christian was supported by an NHMRC-National Heart Foundation Early Career fellowship (No. 1036350). S. Foster was supported by a Healthway Health Promotion Research fellowship (No. 21363). N. Owen was supported by the NHMRC (grant 569940), a NHMRC senior principal research fellowship (No. 1003960), and the Victorian government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. B. Giles-Corti was supported by a NHMRC principal research fellowship (No. 1004900). The Department of Planning and the Department of Transport, the Western Australian Planning Commission, the Western Australian Land Information Authority, Sensis, National Heart Foundation, and Petcare Information and Advisory Service provided funding to support PhD scholarships and in-kind support for the project.