Journal article

Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity against Reactivated HIV-1-Infected Cells

Wen Shi Lee, Jonathan Richard, Marit Lichtfuss, Amos B Smith, Jongwoo Park, Joel R Courter, Bruno N Melillo, Joseph G Sodroski, Daniel E Kaufmann, Andres Finzi, Matthew S Parsons, Stephen J Kent

JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY | AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY | Published : 2016

Abstract

UNLABELLED: Lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 does not diminish the established latent reservoir. A possible cure approach is to reactivate the quiescent genome from latency and utilize immune responses to eliminate cells harboring reactivated HIV-1. It is not known whether antibodies within HIV-1-infected individuals can recognize and eliminate cells reactivated from latency through antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We found that reactivation of HIV-1 expression in the latently infected ACH-2 cell line elicited antibody-mediated NK cell activation but did not result in antibody-mediated killing. The lack of CD4 expression on these HIV-1 envelope (Env)-expressing..

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Grants

Awarded by Australia NHMRC


Awarded by Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR)


Awarded by Establishment of Young Scientist


Awarded by NIH


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Australia NHMRC awards 1052979 and 10471832, an Australia-India Strategic Research Fund award, a Canada Foundation for Innovation Program Leader grant, Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) operating grants 119334 and 134117, Establishment of Young Scientist grant 26702 to A.F., the FRQS AIDS and Infectious Diseases Network, NIH grants AI100645, AI100663, and GM56550, and Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Design (CHAVI-ID) and National Institutes of Health grant RO1 HL-092565. A.F. is a recipient of a Canada Research Chair on Retroviral Entry. J.R. and M.S.P. are recipients of CIHR Fellowship Awards. D.E.K. is supported by a Research Scholar Career Award from the Quebec Health Research Fund (FQRS). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.