Journal article

Long noncoding RNAs in mouse embryonic stem cell pluripotency and differentiation

Marcel E Dinger, Paulo P Amaral, Tim R Mercer, Ken C Pang, Stephen J Bruce, Brooke B Gardiner, Marjan E Askarian-Amiri, Kelin Ru, Giulia Solda, Cas Simons, Susan M Sunkin, Mark L Crowe, Sean M Grimmond, Andrew C Perkins, John S Mattick

GENOME RESEARCH | COLD SPRING HARBOR LAB PRESS, PUBLICATIONS DEPT | Published : 2008

Abstract

The transcriptional networks that regulate embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency and lineage specification are the subject of considerable attention. To date such studies have focused almost exclusively on protein-coding transcripts. However, recent transcriptome analyses show that the mammalian genome contains thousands of long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), many of which appear to be expressed in a developmentally regulated manner. The functions of these remain untested. To identify ncRNAs involved in ES cell biology, we used a custom-designed microarray to examine the expression profiles of mouse ES cells differentiating as embryoid bodies (EBs) over a 16-d time course. We identified 945 ncRNAs..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Medical Postgraduate Scholarship


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank our laboratory colleagues for stimulating discussions. M.E.D. is funded by a Foundation for Research, Science and Technology, New Zealand Fellowship. P. P. A. and T. R. M. are supported by Australian Postgraduate Awards. K. C. P. was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Medical Postgraduate Scholarship (no. 234711). G. S. is supported by a "Borsa di studio per il perfezionamento all'estero," granted by the University of Milan. S. M. S. is supported by the Allen Institute for Brain Science, founded by Paul G. Allen and Jody Patton. S.J.B. was supported by the Wesley Research Institute. S. M. G. and B. B. G. are supported by the Australian Stem Cell Centre and the NHMRC. J.S.M. is supported by an Australian Research Council Federation Fellowship, the University of Queensland, and the Queensland State Government.