Journal article

Social dysfunction after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A translational perspective

Nicholas P Ryan, Cathy Catroppa, Celia Godfrey, Linda J Noble-Haeusslein, Sandy R Shultz, Terence J O'Brien, Vicki Anderson, Bridgette D Semple

NEUROSCIENCE AND BIOBEHAVIORAL REVIEWS | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2016

Abstract

Social dysfunction is common after traumatic brain injury (TBI), contributing to reduced quality of life for survivors. Factors which influence the development or persistence of social deficits after injury remain poorly understood, particularly in the context of ongoing brain maturation during childhood and adolescence. Aberrant social interactions have recently been modeled in adult and juvenile rodents after experimental TBI, providing an opportunity to gain new insights into the underlying neurobiology of these behaviors. Here, we review our current understanding of social dysfunction in both humans and rodent models of TBI, with a focus on brain injuries acquired during early developmen..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Victoria Government Operational Infrastructure Scheme


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was funded through research grants and fellowships awarded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (BDS, CC and VA), The University of Melbourne (BDS), The National Institutes of Health (#R01NS077767 and R01NS050159; LJN-H), the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute and the Victorian Neurotrauma Initiative, and was supported by the Victoria Government Operational Infrastructure Scheme (#CO6E1). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.