Journal article

Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic properties of coadministered azithromycin and piperaquine in pregnant Papua New Guinean women

Brioni R Moore, John M Benjamin, Siu On Auyeung, Sam Salman, Gumul Yadi, Suzanne Griffin, Madhu Page-Sharp, Kevin T Batty, Peter M Siba, Ivo Mueller, Stephen J Rogerson, Timothy ME Davis

British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology | WILEY | Published : 2016

Abstract

AIMS: The aim of the present study was to investigate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of coadministered azithromycin (AZI) and piperaquine (PQ) for treating malaria in pregnant Papua New Guinean women. METHODS: Thirty pregnant women (median age 22 years; 16-32 weeks' gestation) were given three daily doses of 1 g AZI plus 960 mg PQ tetraphosphate with detailed monitoring/blood sampling over 42 days. Plasma AZI and PQ were assayed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Pharmacokinetic analysis was by population-based compartmental models. RESULTS: The treatment was well tolerated. The median (interquartile range) i..

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Grants

Awarded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

All authors have completed the Unified Competing Interest form at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf (available on request from the corresponding author) and declare: IM, SJR and TMED received a Malaria in Pregnancy Consortium Grant funded through Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (#46099) for the submitted work. BRM (Early Career Fellowship #1036951), IM (Senior Research Fellowship #1043345) and TMED (Practitioner Fellowship #1058260) had support from National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia for the submitted work. JBM, SOA, SS, GY, SG, MP-S, KTB and PMS had no financial relationships with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work in the previous 3 years. There were no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.