Journal article

Depressed Mood During Early to Middle Adolescence: A Bi-national Longitudinal Study of the Unique Impact of Family Conflict

Adrian B Kelly, W Alex Mason, Mary B Chmelka, Todd I Herrenkohl, Min Jung Kim, George C Patton, Sheryl A Hemphill, John W Toumbourou, Richard F Catalano

JOURNAL OF YOUTH AND ADOLESCENCE | SPRINGER/PLENUM PUBLISHERS | Published : 2016

Abstract

Adolescent depressed mood is related to the development of subsequent mental health problems, and family problems have been linked to adolescent depression. Longitudinal research on adolescent depressed mood is needed to establish the unique impact of family problems independent of other potential drivers. This study tested the extent to which family conflict exacerbates depressed mood during adolescence, independent of changes in depressed mood over time, academic performance, bullying victimization, negative cognitive style, and gender. Students (13 years old) participated in a three-wave bi-national study (n = 961 from the State of Washington, United States, n = 981 from Victoria, Austral..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute on Drug Abuse


Awarded by National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by ARC


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful for the financial support of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01-DA012140-05) for the International Youth Development Study and the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse (R01AA017188-01) for analysis of the alcohol data. Continued data collection in Victoria has been supported by funding from Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Projects (DPO663371, DPO877359, DP1095744) and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC; Project 594793). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute On Drug Abuse, National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, the National Institutes of Health, ARC or NHMRC. Data analysis was supported by ARC Discovery Project DP130102015 to A. B. Kelly (chief investigator).