Journal article

Sustained lung inflation at birth: what do we know, and what do we need to know?

Karen E McCall, Peter G Davis, Louise S Owen, David G Tingay

ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2016

Abstract

A sustained inflation has been advocated as a potential method of augmenting lung aeration at birth. Clinical trials have suggested that a sustained inflation may lead to a reduced need for intubation and ventilation in the first few days of life, without cardiovascular compromise or increased lung injury. Despite this, a sustained inflation is not currently a standard of practice, mainly due to a lack of clarity regarding the optimal delivery method. Animal trials have sought to refine delivery techniques. This review will outline current recommendations regarding a sustained inflation, discuss potential strategies for its optimal delivery and suggest priorities for future research.

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Centre of Research Excellence Program, Canberra, Australia


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This study is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Centre of Research Excellence Program (KEM and DGT), Canberra, Australia (Grant ID 1057514). DGT is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Career Development Fellowship (Grant ID 1053889). PGD is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Program Grant (Grant ID 606789) and Practitioner Fellowship (Grant ID 556600). All authors are supported by the Victorian Government Operational Infrastructure Support Program.