Journal article

COMT genotype is associated with differential expression of muscarinic M1 receptors in human cortex

Brian Dean, Elizabeth Scarr

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS PART B-NEUROPSYCHIATRIC GENETICS | WILEY | Published : 2016

Abstract

Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype has been associated with varying levels of cognitive functioning and an altered risk of schizophrenia. COMT regulates the breakdown of catecholamines, particularly dopamine, which is thought critical in maintaining cognitive function and the aetiology of schizophrenia. This hypothesis gained support from reports that the VAL allele at rs4680 was associated with poorer performance on cognitive tests and a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia. More recently, genotype at rs4818, part of a hapblock with rs4680, has been shown to impact on cognitive ability more than genotype at rs4680 but, as yet, not the risk for schizophrenia. Here, we determine..

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Grants

Awarded by NHMRC Project


Awarded by NHMRC Fellowship


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Grant sponsor: CRC for Mental Health; Grant sponsor: NHMRC Project; Grant number: APP1045619; Grant sponsor: Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support; Grant sponsor: NHMRC Fellowship; Grant number: APP1002240; Grant sponsor: Australian Research Council; Grant number: Future Fellowship FT100100689; Grant sponsor: Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health; Grant sponsor: Alfred Hospital; Grant sponsor: Victorian Forensic Institute of Medicine; Grant sponsor: University of Melbourne; Grant sponsor: Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council; Grant sponsor: Helen Macpherson Smith Trust; Grant sponsor: Parkinson's Victoria and Perpetual Philanthropic Services.