Journal article

Improvement in touch sensation after stroke is associated with resting functional connectivity changes

Louise C Bannister, Sheila G Crewther, Maria Gavrilescu, Leeanne M Carey

FRONTIERS IN NEUROLOGY | FRONTIERS MEDIA SA | Published : 2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Distributed brain networks are known to be involved in facilitating behavioral improvement after stroke, yet few, if any, studies have investigated the relationship between improved touch sensation after stroke and changes in functional brain connectivity. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify how recovery of somatosensory function in the first 6 months after stroke was associated with functional network changes as measured using resting-state connectivity analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. METHODS: Ten stroke survivors underwent clinical testing and resting-state fMRI scans at 1 and 6 months post-stroke. Ten age-matched healthy participants were included as..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (Career Development Award)


Awarded by Australian Research Council Future Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank the stroke survivors and healthy control participants who participated in the study. They would also like to thank Dr. Rudiger Seitz who provided expertise in delineation of infarcts in Figure 1 and Dr. David Abbott who provided assistance with preliminary analyses. The authors received financial support for the research and authorship of this article from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (project grant numbers 307902 and 1022694; and Career Development Award number 307905 to LC); an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (number FT0992299 to LC); a McDonnell Foundation collaborative award (to LC); a La Trobe University Post-Graduate Research Award (to LB); a La Trobe University Post-Graduate Writing-up Award (to LB); the Austin Hospital Medical Research Foundation; the National Stroke Research Institute of Australia and by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program.