Journal article

Spectral distribution of local field potential responses to electrical stimulation of the retina

Yan T Wong, Kerry Halupka, Tatiana Kameneva, Shaun L Cloherty, David B Grayden, Anthony N Burkitt, Hamish Meffin, Mohit N Shivdasani

JOURNAL OF NEURAL ENGINEERING | IOP PUBLISHING LTD | Published : 2016

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) have been shown to reflect neuronal activity occurring at varying cortical scales. As such, recordings of the LFP may offer a novel way to test the efficacy of neural prostheses and allow improvement of stimulation strategies via neural feedback. Here we use LFP measurements from visual cortex to characterize neural responses to electrical stimulation of the retina. We aim to show that the LFP is a viable signal that contains sufficient information to optimize the performance of sensory neural prostheses. APPROACH: Clinically relevant electrode arrays were implanted in the suprachoroidal space of one eye in four felines...

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Related Projects (8)

Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council's Discovery Projects funding scheme


Awarded by Special Research Initiative (SRI) in Bionic Vision Science and Technology


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Australia


Awarded by Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VLSCI) of the Victorian Government, Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Felix Aplin, Patrick Atkinson, Rosemary Cicione, Sam John, and Ronald Leung for assistance with data collection, Michelle McPhedran and Alexia Saunders for technical assistance, Penelope Allen and Jonathan Yeoh who performed all surgeries, and Owen Burns, Helen Feng, and Vanessa Maxim for electrode array fabrication. We also wish to thank Rob Shepherd, Chris Williams and James Fallon for overall guidance and advice during the in vivo experiments. This research was supported by the Australian Research Council's Discovery Projects funding scheme (DP140104533) and through its Special Research Initiative (SRI) in Bionic Vision Science and Technology awarded to Bionic Vision Australia (BVA) SR1000005. The contribution of MNS was funded by a project grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council Australia (GNT1063093). The research was also supported by the Bertalli Family Foundation through the Bionics Institute. The Bionics Institute acknowledges the support received from the Victorian Government through its Operational Infrastructure Program. This research was supported by a Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VLSCI) grant number [VR0138] on its Peak Computing Facility at the University of Melbourne, an initiative of the Victorian Government, Australia.