Journal article

Feasibility and acceptability of cognitive adaptation training for first-episode psychosis

Kelly A Allott, Eoin Killackey, Pamela Sun, Warrick J Brewer, Dawn I Velligan

EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY | WILEY-BLACKWELL | Published : 2016

Abstract

AIM: Cognitive and functioning impairments are present early in the course of psychotic disorder and remain one of the greatest treatment challenges. Cognitive adaptation training (CAT) is a compensatory approach to psychosocial intervention that is underpinned by a model that incorporates the role of cognition in daily functioning. CAT has established effectiveness in chronic schizophrenia but has received limited investigation in first-episode psychosis (FEP). The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility and acceptability of CAT in young people with FEP. METHODS: This was a single-arm feasibility study of CAT conducted at the Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre, Melb..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC Australia) clinical research training fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Dr Shona Francey and Dylan Alexander for their clinical support and advice during the study. We also thank the case managers who supported the conduct of the study. The study was funded by a University of Melbourne Early Career Researcher Grant, Orygen Youth Health Research Centre and a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC Australia) clinical research training fellowship (No. 628884).