Journal article

Preclinical Alzheimer's disease: Definition, natural history, and diagnostic criteria

Bruno Dubois, Harald Hampel, Howard H Feldman, Philip Scheltens, Paul Aisen, Sandrine Andrieu, Hovagim Bakardjian, Habib Benali, Lars Bertram, Kaj Blennow, Karl Broich, Enrica Cavedo, Sebastian Crutch, Jean-Francois Dartigues, Charles Duyckaerts, Stephane Epelbaum, Giovanni B Frisoni, Serge Gauthier, Remy Genthon, Alida A Gouw Show all

ALZHEIMERS & DEMENTIA | WILEY | Published : 2016

Abstract

During the past decade, a conceptual shift occurred in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) considering the disease as a continuum. Thanks to evolving biomarker research and substantial discoveries, it is now possible to identify the disease even at the preclinical stage before the occurrence of the first clinical symptoms. This preclinical stage of AD has become a major research focus as the field postulates that early intervention may offer the best chance of therapeutic success. To date, very little evidence is established on this "silent" stage of the disease. A clarification is needed about the definitions and lexicon, the limits, the natural history, the markers of progression, and th..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by program "Investissements d'avenir"


Awarded by Alzheimers Research UK


Awarded by Economic and Social Research Council


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING


Funding Acknowledgements

H.H. is supported by the AXA Research Fund, the Fondation Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, and the "Fondation pour la Recherche sur Alzheimer", Paris, France. The research leading to these results has received funding from the program "Investissements d'avenir" ANR-10-IAIHU-06. S.L. is supported by the European Medical Information Framework (EMIF). R.S. is supported by the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association.r The authors acknowledge the helpful contribution of Zaven Khachaturian as an advisor to the Working Group in charge of the article. The meeting was supported by the French International Foundation for Research in Alzheimer's disease (IFRAD).