Journal article

Upper Airway Collapsibility (Pcrit) and Pharyngeal Dilator Muscle Activity are Sleep Stage Dependent

Jayne C Carberry, Amy S Jordan, David P White, Andrew Wellman, Danny J Eckert

SLEEP | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2016

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: An anatomically narrow/highly collapsible upper airway is the main cause of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Upper airway muscle activity contributes to airway patency and, like apnea severity, can be sleep stage dependent. Conversely, existing data derived from a small number of participants suggest that upper airway collapsibility, measured by the passive pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit) technique, is not sleep stage dependent. This study aimed to determine the effect of sleep stage on Pcrit and upper airway muscle activity in a larger cohort than previously tested. METHODS: Pcrit and/or muscle data were obtained from 72 adults aged 20-64 y with and without OSA...

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Grants

Awarded by NIH


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia RD Wright Fellowship


Awarded by Harvard Catalyst


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

Support was provided by NIH (5R01HL048531). A modified continuous positive airway pressure machine was provided by Philips Respironics and was used to obtain the physiologic measurements performed in this study. Dr. Eckert has received support from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia RD Wright Fellowship (1049814). The Harvard Catalyst is funded by UL1 RR 025758-01. Dr. Wellman has received research support from Philips Respironics. Dr. White is a stockholder of Apnicure Inc. and is a consultant for Philips Respironics, NightBalance, and LingualFlex. The other authors have indicated no financial conflicts of interest. The work was performed at the Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.