Journal article

Polymorphism in a lincRNA Associates with a Doubled Risk of Pneumococcal Bacteremia in Kenyan Children

Anna Rautanen, Matti Pirinen, Tara C Mills, Kirk A Rockett, Amy Strange, Anne W Ndungu, Vivek Naranbhai, James J Gilchrist, Celine Bellenguez, Colin Freeman, Gavin Band, Suzannah J Bumpstead, Sarah Edkins, Eleni Giannoulatou, Emma Gray, Serge Dronov, Sarah E Hunt, Cordelia Langford, Richard D Pearson, Zhan Su Show all

The American Journal of Human Genetics | CELL PRESS | Published : 2016

Abstract

Bacteremia (bacterial bloodstream infection) is a major cause of illness and death in sub-Saharan Africa but little is known about the role of human genetics in susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study of bacteremia susceptibility in more than 5,000 Kenyan children as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 (WTCCC2). Both the blood-culture-proven bacteremia case subjects and healthy infants as controls were recruited from Kilifi, on the east coast of Kenya. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of bacteremia in Kilifi and was thus the focus of this study. We identified an association between polymorphisms in a long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincR..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Wellcome Trust as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 project


Awarded by Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics


Awarded by Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Core Award


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by Academy of Finland


Awarded by ERC


Awarded by Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellowship


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Institute for Health Research


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank all the study participants and Kilifi District Hospital clinical team and laboratory staff for their involvement in data and sample collection. The principal funding for this study was provided by the Wellcome Trust, as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 project (grants 084716/Z/08/Z, 085475/B/08/Z, and 085475/Z/08/Z). This work was partially supported by Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics core grant 090532/Z/09/Z and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Core Award (98051). The fieldwork and phenotyping for this study was supported by the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) and the Wellcome Trust of Great Britain. A.R. was supported by the Wellcome Trust (084716/Z/08/Z) and by the European Research Council, M.P. is supported by the Academy of Finland (257654), K.A.R. is supported by the Wellcome Trust (090770/2/09/2), T.N.W. and J.A.G.S. were supported by Senior Research Fellowships from the Wellcome Trust (091758 and 098532, respectively), S.J.C. and C.G.M. were supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centres in Oxford and Guy's & St Thomas', respectively, P. Donnelly was supported in part by a Wolfson-Royal Society Merit Award, A.V.S.H. is supported by a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Award (HCUZZ0) and an ERC Advanced Grant (294557), and C.C.A.S. was supported by a Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellowship (097364/Z/11/Z). This paper was published with the permission of the Director of KEMRI.