Journal article

Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: The Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN)

Nigel J Cairns, Richard J Perrin, Erin E Franklin, Deborah Carter, Benjamin Vincent, Mingqiang Xie, Randall J Bateman, Tammie Benzinger, Karl Friedrichsen, William S Brooks, Glenda M Halliday, Catriona McLean, Bernardino Ghetti, John C Morris

Neuropathology | WILEY-BLACKWELL | Published : 2015

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute on Aging


Awarded by DIAN from the National Institute on Aging


Awarded by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD


Awarded by National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Bio-medical Imaging and Bioengineering


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants P50 AG05681, P01 AG03991, P01 AG26276, and DIAN (U01 AG032438) from the National Institute on Aging, and P30-NS048056 from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, and by the Charles and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Research Initiative of the Washington University Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. The ADNI (National Institute of Health Grant U01 AG024904) is funded by the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Bio-medical Imaging and Bioengineering, and through generous contributions from the following: Pfizer Inc., Wyeth Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly and Company, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck and Co. Inc., AstraZeneca AB, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Alzheimer's Association, Eisai Global Clinical Development, Elan Corporation plc, Forest Laboratories, and the Institute for the Study of Aging, with participation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Industry partnerships are coordinated through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.