Journal article

The Modernization of Colonialism and the Educability of the "Native": Transpacific Knowledge Networks and Education in the Interwar Years

Julie McLeod, Fiona Paisley

HISTORY OF EDUCATION QUARTERLY | JOHN WILEY & SONS INC | Published : 2016

Abstract

This article focuses on a seminar-conference held in Hawaii in 1936 on the “educability” of native peoples. The seminar-conference was convened by New Zealand anthropologist Felix Keesing and Yale education professor Charles Loram and supported by the Carnegie Corporation, among other organizations. Conference delegates—who came from across the Pacific, including the U.S. mainland, Australia, and New Zealand, and from as far as South Africa—joined to discuss the future of colonial education. The residential conference, which lasted several weeks, resulted in published proceedings and the establishment of extensive transpacific networks. One in a series of international congresses on educatio..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Julie McLeod is a Professor of Education at the University of Melbourne (jemcleod@unimelb.edu.au). Her most recent book (edited with Katie Wright) is Rethinking Youth Wellbeing: Critical Perspectives (2015). Fiona Paisley is a cultural historian at Griffith University in Australia (f.paisley@griffith.edu.au). Her most recent book (with Kirsty Reid) is Critical Perspectives on Colonialism: Writing the Empire from Below (2014). Research for this article was supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (McLeod FT 110100646; and also DP0987299) and the authors thank Nicole Davis for research assistance.