Journal article

Does heightened fear of crime lead to poorer mental health in new suburbs, or vice versa?

Sarah Foster, Paula Hooper, Matthew Knuiman, Billie Giles-Corti

SOCIAL SCIENCE & MEDICINE | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2016

Abstract

Fear of crime is implicated as a risk factor for poorer mental health, yet few studies have explored whether there is a causal relationship between fear of crime and health, or tested the direction of the relationship. Does, for example, heightened fear of crime lead to poorer mental health, or could poorer mental health exacerbate fear of crime? RESIDE participants in Perth, Australia, completed a questionnaire three years after moving to their neighbourhood (2007-2008, n = 1230), and again four years later (2011-2012, n = 531). The impact of fear of crime on psychological distress (Kessler-6) was examined in SAS using the Proc Mixed procedure (marginal repeated measures model with unrestri..

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Grants

Awarded by Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway)


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Capacity Building Grant


Awarded by ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award


Awarded by NHMRC CRE in Healthy Liveable Communities postdoctoral fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by Healthway


Funding Acknowledgements

RESIDE was funded by grants from the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway) (#11828), the Australian Research Council (ARC) (#LP0455453) and supported by a National Health & Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Capacity Building Grant (#458688). SF is supported by an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (#DE160100140), PH by a NHMRC CRE in Healthy Liveable Communities postdoctoral fellowship (#1061404), and BGC by a NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship (#1004900).