Journal article

Cognitive effects of adjunctive N-acetyl cysteine in psychosis

M Rapado-Castro, S Dodd, AI Bush, GS Malhi, DR Skvarc, ZX On, M Berk, OM Dean

PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cognitive deficits are predictors of functional outcome in patients with psychosis. While conventional antipsychotics are relatively effective on positive symptoms, their impact on negative and cognitive symptoms is limited. Recent studies have established a link between oxidative stress and neurocognitive deficits in psychosis. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a glutathione precursor with glutamatergic properties, has shown efficacy on negative symptoms and functioning in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively. However, there are few evidence-based approaches for managing cognitive impairment in psychosis. The present study aims to examine the cognitive effects of..

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Grants

Awarded by NARSAD


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Program


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria


Awarded by Stanley Medical Research Institute


Funding Acknowledgements

M.R.-C. is a research fellow and was supported by a Sara Borrell Health Research Fellowship from the Institute of Health Carlos III, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, an Alicia Koplowitz Research Grant, an Alicia Koplowitz Short-Term Visiting Fellowship from the Alicia Koplowitz Foundation, an IiSGM Fellowship Award for Short-Term Placements from the Health Research Institute from the Hospital Gregorio Maranon (IiSGM) (Madrid, Spain) and a NARSAD independent investigator grant (no. 24628). G.S.M. is funded by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Program Grant (application ID: APP1073041). D.R.S. is supported by a Sydney Parker Smith scholarship, and the Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Mental Health. M.B. is supported by a NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (1059660). O.M.D. is a research fellow and has received grant support from the Brain and Behavior Foundation, Simons Autism Foundation, Australian Rotary Health, Stanley Medical Research Institute, Deakin University, Brazilian Society Mobility Program Lilly, NHMRC and an ASBD/Servier grant. This work was supported by a grant from the Stanley Medical Research Institute, as well as the Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria (Bipolar disorder trial registration: Australian Clinical Trials Registry 12605000362695) and by a grant from the Stanley Medical Research Institute (Schizophrenia trial registration: Australian Clinical Trials Registry, protocol 12605000363684, www.actr.org.au). A.I.B. is a shareholder in Costate Pty Ltd, Prana Biotechnology Pty Ltd, Mesoblast Pty Ltd and Nextvet Pty Ltd, he is a paid consultant for Collaborative Medicinal Development Pty Ltd and Brighton Biotech LLC. In the past 3 years, G.S.M. has served on a number of international and national pharmaceutical advisory boards, received funding for research and has been in receipt of honoraria for talks at sponsored meetings worldwide involving the following companies: Lundbeck, Servier and Janssen-Cilag. M.B. has received Grant/Research Support from Bristol Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly, Glaxo SmithKline, Meat and Livestock Board, Organon, Novartis, Mayne Pharma, Servier and Woolworths, has been a speaker for Astra Zeneca, Bristol Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly, Glaxo SmithKline, Janssen Cilag, Lundbeck, Merck, Pfizer, Sanofi Synthelabo, Servier, Solvay and Wyeth, and served as a consultant to Astra Zeneca, Bioadvantex, Bristol Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly, Glaxo SmithKline, Janssen Cilag, Lundbeck Merck and Servier. O.M.D. has received support in kind from BioMedica Nutracuticals, NutritionCare and Bioceuticals. All other authors declare no conflict of interest in relation to the subject of this study.