Journal article

Arousal Intensity is a Distinct Pathophysiological Trait in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Jason Amatoury, Ali Azarbarzin, Magdy Younes, Amy S Jordan, Andrew Wellman, Danny J Eckert

Sleep | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2016

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Arousals from sleep vary in duration and intensity. Accordingly, the physiological consequences of different types of arousals may also vary. Factors that influence arousal intensity are only partly understood. This study aimed to determine if arousal intensity is mediated by the strength of the preceding respiratory stimulus, and investigate other factors mediating arousal intensity and its role on post-arousal ventilatory and pharyngeal muscle responses. METHODS: Data were acquired in 71 adults (17 controls, 54 obstructive sleep apnea patients) instrumented with polysomnography equipment plus genioglossus and tensor palatini electromyography (EMG), a nasal mask and pneumo..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by NeuroSleep National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence (CRE)


Awarded by National Institute of Health


Awarded by NeuroSleep NHMRC CRE Postdoctoral Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC RD Wright Fellowship


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

This was not an industry supported study. This work was supported by the NeuroSleep National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence (CRE) (1060992) and National Institute of Health (5R01HL048531, PI Andrew Wellman). Dr. Amatoury is supported by a NeuroSleep NHMRC CRE Postdoctoral Fellowship (1060992). Dr. Eckert is supported by a NHMRC RD Wright Fellowship (1049814). Dr. Younes is majority owner of YRT Ltd. Dr. Wellman has received research support from Philips Respironics. Dr. Azarbarzin is a former employee of YRT Ltd. The arousal intensity metric applied in this manuscript was developed under YRT Ltd by Dr. Younes and Dr. Azarbarzin. Dr. Jordan has received research support from Philips Respironics. The work was performed at the Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.