Journal article

Sexual behaviour, drug use and health service use by young Noongar people in Western Australia: a snapshot

Robyn Williams, Chris Lawrence, Edward Wilkes, Maurice Shipp, Barbara Henry, Sandra Eades, Bradley Mathers, John Kaldor, Lisa Maher, Dennis Gray

Sexual Health | CSIRO PUBLISHING | Published : 2015

Abstract

UNLABELLED: Background This study aimed to describe sexual health behaviour, alcohol and other drug use, and health service use among young Noongar people in the south-west of Western Australia. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken among a sample of 244 Noongar people aged 16-30 years. RESULTS: The sample was more disadvantaged than the wider Noongar population. Sexual activity was initiated at a young age, 18% had two or more casual sex partners in the previous 12 months, with men more likely to have done so than women (23% vs 14%). Condoms were always or often carried by 57% of men and 37% of women, and 36% of men and 23% of women reported condom use at last sex with a casual pa..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) - International Collaborative Indigenous Health Research Partnership


Funding Acknowledgements

First, we thank those young Noongars who took the time to participate in this study. The study could not have been undertaken without the active involvement and cooperation of Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service, Aboriginal Alcohol and Drug Service, Yorgum Counselling Service, Great Southern Aboriginal Health Service and Next Step Drug and Alcohol Services. The project was overseen by the International Collaborative Indigenous Health Research Project Steering Committee. The project was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) - International Collaborative Indigenous Health Research Partnership Grants 361713 'The role of resiliency in responding to blood-borne viral and sexually transmitted infections in Indigenous communities'. The National Drug Research Institute at Curtin University is supported by funding from the Australian Government under the Substance Misuse Prevention and Service Improvement Grants Fund. LM, BM and JK are supported by NHMRC Fellowships.