Journal article

Human subcortical brain asymmetries in 15,847 people worldwide reveal effects of age and sex

Tulio Guadalupe, Samuel R Mathias, Theo GM Vanerp, Christopher D Whelan, Marcel P Zwiers, Yoshinari Abe, Lucija Abramovic, Ingrid Agartz, Ole A Andreassen, Alejandro Arias-Vasquez, Benjamin S Aribisala, Nicola J Armstrong, Volker Arolt, Eric Artiges, Rosa Ayesa-Arriola, Vatche G Baboyan, Tobias Banaschewski, Gareth Barker, Mark E Bastin, Bernhard T Baune Show all

BRAIN IMAGING AND BEHAVIOR | SPRINGER | Published : 2017

Abstract

The two hemispheres of the human brain differ functionally and structurally. Despite over a century of research, the extent to which brain asymmetry is influenced by sex, handedness, age, and genetic factors is still controversial. Here we present the largest ever analysis of subcortical brain asymmetries, in a harmonized multi-site study using meta-analysis methods. Volumetric asymmetry of seven subcortical structures was assessed in 15,847 MRI scans from 52 datasets worldwide. There were sex differences in the asymmetry of the globus pallidus and putamen. Heritability estimates, derived from 1170 subjects belonging to 71 extended pedigrees, revealed that additive genetic factors influenced..

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Awarded by MRC


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF BIOMEDICAL IMAGING AND BIOENGINEERING


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Open access funding provided by Max Planck Society. The QTIM study thanks research assistants Marlene Grace, Ann Eldridge, Richard Parker, Lenore Sullivan, Lorelle Nunn, Kerrie Mcaloney, Kori Johnson, Aaron Quiggle, and Natalie Garden, radiographers Matthew Meredith, Peter Hobden, Kate Borg, Aiman Al Najjar, and Anita Burns for acquisition of the scans, and David Smyth, Anthony Conciotrorre, Daniel Park, and David Butler for IT support. The IDIVAL-PAFIP study thanks the IDIVAL Neuroimaging Unit for its help in the technical execution of this work. Both Sydney MAS and OATS thank their respective research teams. The LBC1936 study would like to thank Catherine Murray for recruitment of the participants, the radiographers and other staff at the Brain Research Imaging Centre. The Zurich OCD study thanks Reto Iannaccone for supporting the data collection. BIG would also like to thank Hans van Bokhoven for his contributions to the Cognomics initiative.