Journal article

Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) initiative, a pooled birth cohort of 13 pregnancy studies in Africa and the Western Pacific

Holger W Unger, Jordan E Cates, Julie Gutman, Valerie Briand, Nadine Fievet, Innocent Valea, Halidou Tinto, Umberto d'Alessandro, Sarah H Landis, Seth Adu-Afarwuah, Kathryn G Dewey, Feiko Ter Kuile, Stephanie Dellicour, Peter Ouma, Laurence Slutsker, Dianne J Terlouw, Simon Kariuki, John Ayisi, Bernard Nahlen, Meghna Desai Show all

BMJ Open | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2016

Grants

Awarded by STOPPAM


Awarded by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation


Awarded by US Agency for International Development


Awarded by Academy of Finland


Awarded by MiP Consortium through Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation


Awarded by Pregvax Consortium through EU FP7-HEALTH


Awarded by Pfizer


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

The STOPPAM project, 'Strategies To Prevent Pregnancy Associated Malaria' was supported by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (EU FP7); STOPPAM contract number: 200889. STOPPAM I (Benin) and STOPPAM II (Tanzania). The FSP/MISAME study (Burkina Faso) was funded by Nutrition Third World, The Belgium Ministry of Development, Flemish Interuniversity Council, and French Ministry of Development. The ECHO study (Democratic Republic of the Congo) was funded by the Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. The iLiNS-DYAD (Ghana) trial was funded by a grant to the University of California, Davis from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. EMEP was partly supported by the Malaria in Pregnancy (MiP) Consortium, which is funded through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, UK (46099) and partly by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria through a cooperative agreement with Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI), Center for Global Health Research (CGHR), Kisumu, Kenya. The IPTp-MON study (Kenya) was supported by the CDC. The ITN project (Kenya) was funded by the US Agency for International Development. The Special Health Support Fund from the Royal Netherlands Embassy (Nairobi, Kenya) provided additional support for the study of the impact of ITN in pregnancy. The Kisumu study (Kenya) was funded by US Agency for International Development (grant numbers AOT0483-PH1-2171 and HRN-A-00-04-00010-02) and the Netherlands Foundation for the Advancement of Tropical Research. The STOPMIP study (Kenya) was funded by the Malaria in Pregnancy (MiP) Consortium, which is funded through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, UK. The ISTp study (Malawi) was funded by the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP). The LAIS study was supported by grants from the Academy of Finland (grant numbers 79787 and 207010), the Foundation for Pediatric Research in Finland, and the Medical Research Fund of Tampere University Hospital. Azithromycin and its placebo were provided free of charge by Pfizer (New York, New York, USA), which also provided funding for the PCR testing of the sexually transmitted infections. The IPTp study (Papua New Guinea (PNG)) was funded by the MiP Consortium, through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (46099); the Pregvax Consortium, through a grant from the EU FP7-2007-HEALTH (PREGVAX 201588) and the Spanish Government (EUROSALUD 2008 Programme); and Pfizer, through an investigator-initiated research grant (WS394663). The Sek study (PNG) was supported by AusAID (grant to PNG Institute of Medical Research (IMR)), the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; Australian Research Council; Wellcome Trust; and Veterans Affairs Research Service. The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute is supported by the NHMRC Infrastructure for Research Institutes Support Scheme and Victorian State Government Operational Infrastructure Support. JEC was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (Pre-doctoral Training in Infectious Disease Epidemiology grant #5 T32 AI070114).