Journal article

A systematic review and secondary data analysis of the interactions between the serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and environmental and psychological factors in eating disorders

Vanja Rozenblat, Deborah Ong, Matthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Kirsti Akkermann, David Collier, Rutger CME Engels, Fernando Fernandez-Aranda, Jaanus Harro, Judith R Homberg, Andreas Karwautz, Evelyn Kiive, Kelly L Klump, Christine L Larson, Sarah E Racine, Jodie Richardson, Howard Steiger, Scott F Stoltenberg, Tatjana van Strien, Gudrun Wagner, Janet Treasure Show all

JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2017

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To summarize and synthesize the growing gene x environment (GxE) research investigating the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) in the eating disorders (ED) field, and overcome the common limitation of low sample size, by undertaking a systematic review followed by a secondary data meta-analysis of studies identified by the review. METHOD: A systematic review of articles using PsycINFO, PubMed, and EMBASE was undertaken to identify studies investigating the interaction between 5-HTTLPR and an environmental or psychological factor, with an ED-related outcome variable. Seven studies were identified by the systematic review, with complete data sets of five c..

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Grants

Awarded by European Union


Awarded by University of Melbourne


Awarded by U.S. National Institute of Mental Health


Awarded by Estonian Ministry of Education and Science


Awarded by Michigan State University


Awarded by Quebec government's Joint CQRS-FRSQ-MSSS Program in Mental Health


Awarded by Canadian Institute of Health Research


Awarded by Dutch Organization for Scientific Research


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH


Funding Acknowledgements

Financial support was received from the European Union (Framework-V Mutlicenter Research Grant, QK1-1999-916), the University of Melbourne Early Career Researcher Grants Scheme (2014, 1350035), U.S. National Institute of Mental Health (1R15MH077654-01A1), the Estonian Ministry of Education and Science (IUT20-40 and IUT 42-2), the National Institute of Health and Michigan State University (T32-MH070343 and #05-IRGP-883), the Quebec government's Joint CQRS-FRSQ-MSSS Program in Mental Health (SR-4306), the Canadian Institute of Health Research (MOP-57929), the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (no. 400-05-051) and the Radboud University Nijmegen. None of these institutions had any role in the study design, collection, analysis and interpretation of data, preparation of the manuscript, or decision to submit the manuscript for publication.