Journal article

The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

Rory N Pruitt, Benjamin Schwessinger, Anna Joe, Nicholas Thomas, Furong Liu, Markus Albert, Michelle R Robinson, Leanne Jade G Chan, Dee Dee Luu, Huamin Chen, Ofir Bahar, Arsalan Daudi, David De Vleesschauwer, Daniel Caddell, Weiguo Zhang, Xiuxiang Zhao, Xiang Li, Joshua L Heazlewood, Deling Ruan, Dipali Majumder Show all

Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY | Published : 2021

Abstract

Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase Rax..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by NIH


Awarded by US Israel Binational Science Foundation


Awarded by Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the U.S. Department of Energy


Awarded by European Molecular Biology Organization long-term fellowship


Awarded by Human Frontiers Science Program long-term postdoctoral fellowship


Awarded by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research


Awarded by Welch Foundation


Funding Acknowledgements

Funded by NIH GM59962 and the US Israel Binational Science Foundation grant #2 2011062. This work was also conducted in part by the Joint BioEnergy Institute and was supported by the Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract no. DEAC02-05CH11231. B.S. was supported by a European Molecular Biology Organization long-term fellowship (ALTF 1290-2011) and by a Human Frontiers Science Program long-term postdoctoral fellowship (LT000674/2012). The laboratories of P.B.P. and R.V.S. are supported by "Plant-Microbe and Soil Interactions" project (BSC0117) of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research. J.S.B. and M.R.R. were supported by NIH R21 GM099028 (J.S.B.) and Welch Foundation F1155 (J.S.B.). D.C. was supported by Monsanto's Beachell-Borlaug International Scholars Program fellowship.