Journal article

Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Impair Early Graft Function Following Allogeneic Islet Transplantation

Kevin V Chow, Emma M Carrington, Yifan Zhan, Andrew M Lew, Robyn M Sutherland

CELL TRANSPLANTATION | COGNIZANT COMMUNICATION CORP | Published : 2017

Abstract

Islet transplantation can cure type 1 diabetes but is limited by lack of donor organs and early graft dysfunction, such that many patients require multiple transplants to achieve insulin independence. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) arise during inflammation and allograft encounters where they can promote various innate and adaptive immune responses. To determine whether moDCs impair early graft function following allogeneic islet transplantation, we transplanted MHC-mismatched BALB/c (H-2d) islets into diabetic C57BL/6-CCR2.DTR recipients (H-2b) treated with either saline (control) or diphtheria toxin (DT) to deplete moDCs. Graft function was assessed by blood glucose (BG) measurem..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC Independent Research Institutes Infrastructure Support Scheme


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors thank Merle Dayton, Catherine Yates, and Lauren Wilkins for animal care and technical assistance. This work was supported by the Rebecca L. Cooper Foundation, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) grants (1037321, 1043414, 1080321, and 1105209), NHMRC Independent Research Institutes Infrastructure Support Scheme grant (361646), and Victorian State Government Operational Infrastructure Support grant. K.V.C. has received a Kidney Health Australia Biomedical Scholarship and an NHMRC Postgraduate Scholarship. We acknowledge the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin nation as the traditional owners and custodians of the land on which most of the work was performed. The authors declare no conflicts of interest.