Journal article

Assessment of the Plasmodium falciparum Preerythrocytic Antigen UIS3 as a Potential Candidate for a Malaria Vaccine

Rhea J Longley, Benedict R Halbroth, Ahmed M Salman, Katie J Ewer, Susanne H Hodgson, Chris J Janse, Shahid M Khan, Adrian VS Hill, Alexandra J Spencer

Infection and Immunity | AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY | Published : 2017

Abstract

Efforts are under way to improve the efficacy of subunit malaria vaccines through assessments of new adjuvants, vaccination platforms, and antigens. In this study, we further assessed the Plasmodium falciparum antigen upregulated in infective sporozoites 3 (PfUIS3) as a vaccine candidate. PfUIS3 was expressed in the viral vectors chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) and used to immunize mice in a prime-boost regimen. We previously demonstrated that this regimen could provide partial protection against challenge with chimeric P. berghei parasites expressing PfUIS3. We now show that ChAd63-MVA PfUIS3 can also provide partial cross-species protection agains..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by Rhodes Trust


Awarded by UK National Institute of Health Research through the Oxford Biomedical Research Centre


Awarded by European Union Seventh Framework Programme


Awarded by Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Fellow


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for manufacture and quality control release and stability studies of Sanaria's PfSPZ challenge was provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (http://www.niaid.nih.gov) under grant (R44AI058375 Universal Attenuated Malaria Sporozoite Vaccine and Challenge System). The present work was funded by a grant from the Wellcome Trust (grant 095540/Z/11/Z) to A. V. S. H., with additional funding by the Rhodes Trust and a Nuffield Department of Medicine Studentship to support R. J. L. The human CHMI study (VAC049) was supported by the UK National Institute of Health Research through the Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (http:// www.oxfordbrc.org/) (A91301 adult vaccine program) and the Wellcome Trust (grant 084113/Z/07/Z). B. R. H. receives funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2012-2016 under grant agreement 316655 (VACTRAIN). S. H. H. is a Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Fellow (grant 097940/Z/11/Z). A. V. S. H. is a Jenner Institute Investigator, and A. J. S. is a James Martin Fellow.