Journal article

Ambulatory Antibiotic Use and Prescription Drug Coverage in Older Adults

Yuting Zhang, Bruce Y Lee, Julie M Donohue

ARCHIVES OF INTERNAL MEDICINE | AMER MEDICAL ASSOC | Published : 2010

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that use of medications to treat chronic conditions is highly sensitive to out-of-pocket price and influenced by changes in insurance coverage. Because antibiotics target infections and are used for a short period, one may expect antibiotic use to be less responsive to price. However, no studies have evaluated how antibiotic use changes with drug coverage. We evaluate changes in ambulatory oral antibiotic use after implementation of the Medicare drug benefit (Part D). METHODS: We conducted a comparison group analysis 2 years before and after implementation of Part D using insurance claims data from a large Medicare Advantage plan (January 1, 2004, throu..

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Grants

Awarded by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)


Awarded by National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences


Awarded by AHRQ


Awarded by National Institute of Mental Health


Awarded by AGENCY FOR HEALTHCARE RESEARCH AND QUALITY


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH


Funding Acknowledgements

Dr Zhang is the coprincipal investigator for a project in part funded by Highmark Inc (a Medicare-Advantage plan) to evaluate the economic impact of a high-deductible health care plan on medical care spending.Dr Zhang was supported by a challenge grant 1RC1MH088510-01, grant 1R01HS018657-01 from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), RAND-University of Pittsburgh Health Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health Computational and Systems Models in Public Health Pilot Program. Dr Lee was supported by the National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS) grant 1U54GM088491-0109, and the Pennsylvania Department of Health Center of Excellence in Prevention and Control of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterial Infections. Dr Donohue was supported by 1R01HS017695 from the AHRQ and 1R34 MH082682 from the National Institute of Mental Health.