Journal article

Systematic Biases in Cross-sectional Community Studies may Underestimate the Effectiveness of Stop-Smoking Medications

Ron Borland, Timea R Partos, Michael Cummings

Nicotine & Tobacco Research | OXFORD UNIV PRESS | Published : 2012

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Randomized, controlled trials typically indicate stop-smoking medications (SSMs: e.g., Varenicline, Bupropion, and over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapies) to be effective, whereas cross-sectional community-based studies have found them to be less effective, ineffective, or even associated with higher risk of relapse. Consequently, some critics have suggested SSMs have no useful applications in "real-world" settings. This discrepancy may, however, be due to systematic biases affecting cross-sectional survey outcomes. Namely, failed quit attempts where SSMs were used may be better recalled than failed unassisted attempts. Moreover, smokers who choose to quit using SSMs m..

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Grants

Awarded by Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York


Awarded by National Cancer Institute of the United States


Awarded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation


Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Cancer Research UK


Awarded by Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

The ITC 4-country survey is supported by multiple grants including Roswell Park Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (R01 CA 100362 and P50 CA111236) and also in part from grant Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (P01 CA138389), all funded by the National Cancer Institute of the United States, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (045734), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (57897, 79551), National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (265903, 450110, APP1005922), Cancer Research UK (C312/A3726), Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative (014578), Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, National Cancer Institute of Canada/Canadian Cancer Society.