Journal article

Patterns of cognitive dissonance-reducing beliefs among smokers: a longitudinal analysis from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey

Omid Fotuhi, Geoffrey T Fong, Mark P Zanna, Ron Borland, Hua-Hie Yong, K Michael Cummings

TOBACCO CONTROL | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2013

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper is to assess whether smokers adjust their beliefs in a pattern that is consistent with Cognitive Dissonance Theory. This is accomplished by examining the longitudinal pattern of belief change among smokers as their smoking behaviours change. METHODS: A telephone survey was conducted of nationally representative samples of adult smokers from Canada, the USA, the UK and Australia from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey. Smokers were followed across three waves (October 2002 to December 2004), during which they were asked to report on their smoking-related beliefs and their quitting behaviour. FINDINGS: Smokers with no history of quitting ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Cancer Institute of the USA


Awarded by Roswell Park Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center


Awarded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation


Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Cancer Research UK


Awarded by Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

We would also like to acknowledge the other members of the ITC team, Mary E Thompson for her help with data analysis and Karina Schumann for her technical assistance and support. We would also like to express our appreciation for support from the Prevention Scientist Award from the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute, granted to GTF.This research was funded by grants from the National Cancer Institute of the USA (R01 CA 100362), the Roswell Park Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (P50 CA111236), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (045734), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (57897 and 79551), National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (265903 and 450110), Cancer Research UK (C312/A3726) and Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative (014578), with additional support from the Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, National Cancer Institute of Canada/Canadian Cancer Society (now the Propel Centre for Population Health Impact at the University of Waterloo) and the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. Additional funding to the first author was provided through a CIHR Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarship.