Journal article

Socio-Economic Variation in Price Minimizing Behaviors: Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey

Andrea S Licht, Andrew J Hyland, Richard J O'Connor, Frank J Chaloupka, Ron Borland, Geoffrey T Fong, Nigar Nargis, K Michael Cummings

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health | MDPI | Published : 2011

Abstract

This paper examines how socio-economic status (SES) modifies how smokers adjust to changes in the price of tobacco products through utilization of multiple price minimizing techniques. Data come from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Four Country Survey, nationally representative samples of adult smokers and includes respondents from Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia. Cross-sectional analyses were completed among 8,243 respondents (7,038 current smokers) from the survey wave conducted between October 2006 and February 2007. Analyses examined predictors of purchasing from low/untaxed sources, using discount cigarettes or roll-your-own (RYO) to..

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Grants

Awarded by National Cancer Institute, US


Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Cancer Research UK


Awarded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation


Awarded by Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, US (P50 CA111326, P01 CA138389, RO1 CA100362, and R01 CA125116); Canadian Institutes of Health Research (57897 and 79551), National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (265903 and 450110), Cancer Research UK (C312/A3726), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (045734), and Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative (014578), with additional support from the Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, National Cancer Institute of Canada/Canadian Cancer Society and the Propel Centre for Population Health Impact. None of the sponsors played any direct role in the design and conduct of the study; the collection, management, analysis and interpretation of the data or the preparation, review, and approval of the manuscript.