Journal article

The importance of the belief that "light" cigarettes are smoother in misperceptions of the harmfulness of "light" cigarettes in the Republic of Korea: a nationally representative cohort study

Annika C Green, Geoffrey T Fong, Ron Borland, Anne CK Quah, Hong Gwan Seo, Yeol Kim, Tara Elton-Marshall

BMC Public Health | BIOMED CENTRAL LTD | Published : 2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND: A number of countries have banned misleading cigarette descriptors such as "light" and "low-tar" as called for by the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. These laws, however, do not address the underlying cigarette design elements that contribute to misperceptions about harm. This is the first study to examine beliefs about "light" cigarettes among Korean smokers, and the first to identify factors related to cigarette design that are associated with the belief that "light" cigarettes are less harmful. METHODS: We analysed data from Wave 3 of the ITC Korea Survey, a telephone survey of a nationally representative sample of 1,753 adult smokers, conducted October - December..

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Grants

Awarded by U.S. National Cancer Institute


Awarded by U.S. National Cancer Institute (Roswell Park Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center )


Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research


Awarded by CIHR Training Grant in Population Intervention for Chronic Disease Prevention: A Pan-Canadian Program


Funding Acknowledgements

The ITC Korea Project was supported by grants from the U.S. National Cancer Institute (R01 CA125116 and the Roswell Park Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (P50 CA111236)), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (Operating Grants 79551 and 115016), and the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare. ACG was supported by the CIHR Training Grant in Population Intervention for Chronic Disease Prevention: A Pan-Canadian Program (Grant #: 53893). Additional support was provided to Geoffrey T. Fong from a Senior Investigator Award from the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and a Prevention Scientist Award from the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute. The funding sources had no role in the study design, in collection, analysis, and interpretation of data, in the writing of the report, and in the decision to submit the paper for publication.