Journal article

The impact of the United Kingdom's national smoking cessation strategy on quit attempts and use of cessation services: Findings from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey

Jack E Gibson, Rachael L Murray, Ron Borland, K Michael Cummings, Geoffrey T Fong, David Hammond, Ann McNeill

NICOTINE & TOBACCO RESEARCH | OXFORD UNIV PRESS | Published : 2010

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control recommends that provision of cessation support should be included in national tobacco control strategies. This study examines the impact of the United Kingdom's national smoking cessation strategy on quit attempts, use of treatment and short-term abstinence, relative to the United States, Canada, and Australia where less support is provided. METHODS: Data on quitting behavior and use of support were obtained for all smokers enrolled in the International Tobacco Control 4 Country Survey between 2002 and 2005. Generalized estimating equations were used to calculate the relative odds (adjusted by age, sex, and H..

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Grants

Awarded by National Cancer Institute of the United States


Awarded by Roswell Park Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center


Awarded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation


Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Cancer Research UK


Awarded by Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative


Awarded by Economic and Social Research Council


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Medical Research Council, the United Kingdom, and the United Kingdom Centre for Tobacco Control Studies. The ITC 4 Country Survey is funded by grants from the National Cancer Institute of the United States (through R01 CA 100362 and through the Roswell Park Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center, P50 CA111236), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (045734), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (57897), National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (265903), Cancer Research UK (C312/A3726), and Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative (014578), with additional support from the Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, National Cancer Institute of Canada/Canadian Cancer Society.