Journal article

Quitting smoking and change in alcohol consumption in the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey

Christopher W Kahler, Ron Borland, Andrew Hyland, Sherry A McKee, Richard J O'Connor, Geoffrey T Fong, K Michael Cummings

Drug and Alcohol Dependence | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2010

Abstract

Although frequent heavy drinking has been associated with decreased odds of quitting smoking, the extent to which smoking cessation is associated with decreased alcohol consumption is less clear. The present study examined over a 2-year period whether individuals who quit smoking for at least 6 months, compared to those making a quit attempt but continuing to smoke and to those not making any attempt to quit smoking, showed greater reductions in drinking frequency, average weekly quantity of alcohol consumption, and frequency of heavy drinking. Data were drawn from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey, a prospective cohort study of smokers in Australia, Canada, the UK, and t..

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Grants

Awarded by U.S. National Cancer Institutes


Awarded by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism


Awarded by Canadian Institutes for Health Research


Awarded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Commonwealth Department of Health and Aging, Cancer Research UK


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported by U.S. National Cancer Institutes grants P50 CA111236, RO1 CA100362, and P50 CA84719, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism grant P50 AA15632, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (57897), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (045734), the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (265903), the Australian Commonwealth Department of Health and Aging, Cancer Research UK (C312/A3726), the Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute of Canada/Canadian Cancer Society, and the Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative. These organizations had no further role in study design, in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, in the writing of the report, or in the decision to submit the paper for publication.