Journal article

Alcohol consumption and quitting smoking in the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey

Christopher W Kahler, Ron Borland, Andrew Hyland, Sherry A McKee, Mary E Thompson, K Michael Cummings

Drug and Alcohol Dependence | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2009

Abstract

Although greater alcohol consumption has been associated with decreased odds of quitting smoking in prospective studies, the aspects of drinking most strongly associated with quitting have not been fully explored and examination of potential confounder variables has been limited. Further studies are needed to inform efforts to enhance smoking cessation among the substantial portion of smokers who drink alcohol. The present study examines: (a) drinking frequency, average weekly quantity of alcohol consumption, and frequency of heavy drinking as prospective predictors of quit smoking behaviors, (b) difference across countries in this prediction, and (c) third variables that might account for t..

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Grants

Awarded by US National Cancer Institutes


Awarded by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism


Awarded by Canadian Institutes for Health Research


Awarded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Commonwealth Department of Health and Aging, Cancer Research UK


Funding Acknowledgements

Role of funding source: This study was supported by US National Cancer Institutes grants P50 CA111236, RO1 CA100362, and P50 CA84719, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism grant P50 AA15632, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (57897), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (045734), the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (265903), the Australian Commonwealth Department of Health and Aging, Cancer Research UK (C312/A3726), the Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute of Canada/Canadian Cancer Society, and the Canadian Tobacco Control Research Initiative. These organizations had no further role in study design, in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, in the writing of the report, or in the decision to submit the paper for publication.