Journal article

Surface reflectance drives nest box temperature profiles and thermal suitability for target wildlife

Stephen R Griffiths, Jessica A Rowland, Natalie J Briscoe, Pia E Lentini, Kathrine A Handasyde, Linda F Lumsden, Kylie A Robert

PLOS ONE | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2017

Abstract

Thermal properties of tree hollows play a major role in survival and reproduction of hollow-dependent fauna. Artificial hollows (nest boxes) are increasingly being used to supplement the loss of natural hollows; however, the factors that drive nest box thermal profiles have received surprisingly little attention. We investigated how differences in surface reflectance influenced temperature profiles of nest boxes painted three different colors (dark-green, light-green, and white: total solar reflectance 5.9%, 64.4%, and 90.3% respectively) using boxes designed for three groups of mammals: insectivorous bats, marsupial gliders and brushtail possums. Across the three different box designs, dark..

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Grants

Awarded by Parks Victoria Research Partners Panel


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment (grant to SRG), the Parks Victoria Research Partners Panel (grant RPP1314P18 to SRG and KAR), the Normal Wettenhall Foundation (grant to SRG) and the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning's Communities for Nature (grant to SRG and PEL). PEL and NJB are supported by the Australian Government's National Environmental Science Program Threatened Species Recovery Hub. SRG is supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.We thank Sonja Dechian, Robert Bender, John Salisbury, Michael Bajer, Peter Rowland, Susan Pepper and Kristin Semmens for assistance during fieldwork, and Casey Visintin for drafting the CAD nest box diagrams. SRG is supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship. PEL and NJB are supported by the Australian Government's National Environmental Science Program Threatened Species Recovery Hub.