Journal article

Socioeconomic status in childhood and C reactive protein in adulthood: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Richard S Liu, Allison E Aiello, Fiona K Mensah, Constantine E Gasser, Kuna Rueb, Billie Cordell, Markus Juonala, Melissa Wake, David P Burgner

JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Inflammation plays a central role in cardiometabolic disease and may represent a mechanism linking low socioeconomic status (SES) in early life and adverse cardiometabolic health outcomes in later life. Accumulating evidence suggests an association between childhood SES and adult inflammation, but findings have been inconsistent. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to quantify the association between childhood (age <18 years) SES and the inflammatory marker C reactive protein (CRP) in adulthood. Studies were identified in Medline and Embase databases, and by reviewing the bibliographies of articles published from 1946 to December 2..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities


Awarded by NIH National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases


Awarded by Carolina Population Center NIH Center grant


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Awarded by National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (Postgraduate Scholarship 1114567 to RSL, Senior Research Fellowships 1046518 to MW and 1064629 to DPB, Early Career Fellowship 1037449 and Career Development Fellowship 1111160 to FKM); by the Center for Integrative Approaches to Health Disparities (P60MD002249 to AEA); NIH National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (R01DK087864 to AEA); the Carolina Population Center and its NIH Center grant (P2C HD050924 to AEA); the Australian Government (an Australian Postgraduate Award to CEG); and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (Murdoch Childrens Research Institute Top Up Scholarship to CEG). Research at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute is supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Program.