Journal article

Habitual exercise levels are associated with cerebral amyloid load in presymptomatic autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease

Belinda M Brown, Hamid R Sohrabi, Kevin Taddei, Samantha L Gardener, Stephanie R Rainey-Smith, Jeremiah J Peiffer, Chengjie Xiong, Anne M Fagan, Tammie Benzinger, Virginia Buckles, Kirk I Erickson, Roger Clarnette, Tejal Shah, Colin L Masters, Michael Weiner, Nigel Cairns, Martin Rossor, Neill R Graff-Radford, Stephen Salloway, Jonathan Voeglein Show all

ALZHEIMERS & DEMENTIA | ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC | Published : 2017

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported exercise levels and Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers, in a cohort of autosomal dominant AD mutation carriers. METHODS: In 139 presymptomatic mutation carriers from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network, the relationship between self-reported exercise levels and brain amyloid load, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42, and CSF tau levels was evaluated using linear regression. RESULTS: No differences in brain amyloid load, CSF Aβ42, or CSF tau were observed between low and high exercise groups. Nevertheless, when examining only those already accumulating AD pathology (i.e., amyloid positive), low..

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Grants

Awarded by Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) - National Institute on Aging, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)


Awarded by Medical Research Council Dementias Platform UK


Awarded by Alzheimer's Australia Dementia Research Foundation


Awarded by NHMRC National Institute of Dementia


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Institute for Health Research


Awarded by NATIONAL CENTER FOR ADVANCING TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING


Funding Acknowledgements

Data collection and sharing for this project was supported by the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN; UF1 AG032438; to R.J.B. and J.C.M.) funded by the National Institute on Aging, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the Medical Research Council Dementias Platform UK (M.R.) (MR/L023784/1 and MR/009076/1), and National Institute for Health Research Queen Square Dementia Biomedical Research Unit. B.M.B. received research support from the Alzheimer's Australia Dementia Research Foundation (G1001605), NHMRC National Institute of Dementia (APP1097105), and the Brain Foundation. J.C.M. and R.J.B. received research support from the National Institute of Health. This manuscript has been reviewed by DIAN study investigators for scientific content and consistency of data interpretation with previous DIAN study publications. The DIAN Expanded Registry welcomes contact from any families or treating clinicians interested in research about autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer's disease.