Journal article

Long-term unmet needs and associated factors in stroke or TIA survivors An observational study

Muideen T Olaiya, Dominique A Cadilhac, Joosup Kim, Mark R Nelson, Velandai K Srikanth, Nadine E Andrew, Christopher F Bladin, Richard P Gerraty, Sharyn M Fitzgerald, Thanh Phan, Judith Frayne, Amanda G Thrift

NEUROLOGY | LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS | Published : 2017

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To extensively investigate long-term unmet needs in survivors of stroke or TIA and to identify factors associated with these unmet needs. METHODS: Community-dwelling adults were invited to participate in a survey ≥2 years after discharge for stroke/TIA. Unmet needs were assessed across 5 domains: activities and participation, environmental factors, body functions, post-acute care, and secondary prevention. Factors associated with unmet needs were determined with multivariable negative binomial regression. RESULTS: Of 485 participants invited to complete the survey, 391 (81%) responded (median age 73 years, 67% male). Most responders (87%) reported unmet needs in ≥1 of the measured..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowships


Awarded by NHMRC/National Heart Foundation Career Development Fellowships


Awarded by Monash International Postgraduate Research Scholarship


Awarded by Stroke Foundation Postgraduate Scholarship


Funding Acknowledgements

The STANDFIRM trial was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (586605). A.G.T was supported by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowships (1042600 and 438700). D.A.C and V.K.S were supported by cofunded NHMRC/National Heart Foundation Career Development Fellowships (1063761, 1061457). M.T. was funded by Monash Graduate Scholarship and Monash International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (24909602). J.K. was funded by the Stroke Foundation Postgraduate Scholarship (PP 10M 5505). The needs survey was funded by the Monash Partners Academic Health Science Centre. Funders had no role in the study design, collection, analysis and interpretation of data, and writing of this manuscript.