Journal article

Neuropredictors of oromotor feeding impairment in 12 month-old children

Katherine Sanchez, Angela T Morgan, Justine M Slattery, Joy E Olsen, Katherine J Lee, Peter J Anderson, Deanne K Thompson, Lex W Doyle, Jeanie LY Cheong, Alicia J Spittle

EARLY HUMAN DEVELOPMENT | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2017

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Feeding impairment is prevalent in children with neurodevelopmental issues. Neuroimaging and neurobehavioral outcomes at term are predictive of later neuromotor impairment, but it is unknown whether they predict feeding impairment. AIMS: To determine whether neurobehavior and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at term predict oromotor feeding at 12 months in preterm and term-born children. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: 248 infants (97 born <30 weeks and 151 born at term) recruited at birth. OUTCOME MEASURES: Neurobehavioral assessments (General Movements (GMA), Hammersmith Neonatal Neurological Examination (HNNE), Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Network Neuro..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council [Centre for Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine]


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council [Health Professional Research Fellowship]


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council [Career Development Fellowship]


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council [Practitioner Fellowship]


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council [Senior Research Fellowship]


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council [Centre for Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine 1060733; project grants 1024516, 1028822; Health Professional Research Fellowship 1053787 to JC; Career Development Fellowship 1108714 to AS; 1012236 to DT; 1053609 to KL; Practitioner Fellowship 1105008 to AM; Senior Research Fellowship 1081288 to PA], the Royal Children's Hospital Foundation, an Australian Postgraduate Award [KS] and Speech Pathology Australia via a Nadia Verrall Memorial Research Grant [KS]. Murdoch Childrens Research Institute is supported by Victorian government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. Funders had no involvements in study design; collection, analysis or interpretation of data; writing this article; or the decision to submit the article for publication.