Journal article

An Enzyme-Coated Metal-Organic Framework Shell for Synthetically Adaptive Cell Survival

Kang Liang, Joseph J Richardson, Christian J Doonan, Xavier Mulet, Yi Ju, Jiwei Cui, Frank Caruso, Paolo Falcaro

ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION | WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH | Published : 2017

Abstract

A bioactive synthetic porous shell was engineered to enable cells to survive in an oligotrophic environment. Eukaryotic cells (yeast) were firstly coated with a β-galactosidase (β-gal), before crystallization of a metal-organic framework (MOF) film on the enzyme coating; thereby producing a bioactive porous synthetic shell. The β-gal was an essential component of the bioactive shell as it generated nutrients (that is, glucose and galactose) required for cell viability in nutrient-deficient media (lactose-based). Additionally, the porous MOF coating carried out other vital functions, such as 1) shielding the cells from cytotoxic compounds and radiation, 2) protecting the non-native enzymes (β..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology


Awarded by ARC under the Australian Laureate Fellowship Scheme


Awarded by ARC


Funding Acknowledgements

K.L. and J.J.R. acknowledges the CSIRO OCE Science Scheme. This research was conducted and funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (Project Number CE140100036) and funded by the ARC under the Australian Laureate Fellowship (FL120100030) Scheme. This work was performed in part at the Materials Characterisation and Fabrication Platform (MCFP) at the University of Melbourne and the Victorian Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF). Part of this research was conducted at the SAXS/WAXS beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. C.D. and P.F. acknowledge the ARC for DP grant DP170103531, "Metal-organic frameworks at the biointerface."