Journal article

POSTTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION AS A CRITICAL DETERMINANT OF CYTOPLASMIC INNATE IMMUNE RECOGNITION

Paul J Baker, Dominic De Nardo, Fiona Moghaddas, Son Tran Le, Annabell Bachem, Nguyen Tan, Thomas Hayman, Hazel Tye, James E Vince, Sammy Bedoui, Richard L Ferrero, Seth L Masters

PHYSIOLOGICAL REVIEWS | AMER PHYSIOLOGICAL SOC | Published : 2017

Abstract

Cell surface innate immune receptors can directly detect a variety of extracellular pathogens to which cytoplasmic innate immune sensors are rarely exposed. Instead, within the cytoplasm, the environment is rife with cellular machinery and signaling pathways that are indirectly perturbed by pathogenic microbes to activate intracellular sensors, such as pyrin, NLRP1, NLRP3, or NLRC4. Therefore, subtle changes in key intracellular processes such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and other pathways leading to posttranslational protein modification are key determinants of innate immune recognition in the cytoplasm. This concept is critical to establish the "guard hypothesis" whereby otherwise ..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Project Grants (1057815, 1099262, and 1101405), Fellowships (to S. L. Masters and J. E. Vince), and an Independent Research Institutes Infrastructure Support Scheme Grant (361646).