Journal article

Genetic Variation, Not Cell Type of Origin, Underlies the Majority of Identifiable Regulatory Differences in iPSCs

Courtney K Burrows, Nicholas E Banovich, Bryan J Pavlovic, Kristen Patterson, Irene Gallego Romero, Jonathan K Pritchard, Yoav Gilad

PLOS GENETICS | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2016

Abstract

The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) revolutionized human genetics by allowing us to generate pluripotent cells from easily accessible somatic tissues. This technology can have immense implications for regenerative medicine, but iPSCs also represent a paradigm shift in the study of complex human phenotypes, including gene regulation and disease. Yet, an unresolved caveat of the iPSC model system is the extent to which reprogrammed iPSCs retain residual phenotypes from their precursor somatic cells. To directly address this issue, we used an effective study design to compare regulatory phenotypes between iPSCs derived from two types of commonly used somatic precursor cells. We..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Institutes of Health Clinical and Translational Science Award


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Howard Hughes Medical Institute (https://www.hhmi.org/) funds to JKP and by National Institutes of Health (http://www.nih.gov/) grants MH084703 and HG006123 to YG and JKP. CKB was supported by a National Institutes of Health (http://www.ncats.nih.gov/ctsa) Clinical and Translational Science Award 5 TL1 TR 432-7 pre-doctoral fellowship. NEB was supported by an National Institutes of Health (http://www.nih.gov/) training grant GM007197 and an National Institutes of Health (http://www.nih.gov/) predoctoral award F31 AG 044948. IGR was supported by a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship (http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/Funding/Biomedicalscience/Funding-schemes/Fellowships/Basicbiomedical-fellowships/WTX033549.html). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.